Mark 6:6b-13

Chances are your day will be full of distractions: an unexpected phone call, an unscheduled request, an addictive game on a smartphone, click bait articles on the Internet. We find it easy to get off course.

Chances are a particular fear will be part of your day. The news may scare us into focusing only on selfish concerns. We may be tempted to care solely for ourselves, stocking up on what could easily become too expensive or scarce, worrying about the future in harmful ways. 

Distractions and fears have always challenged Christ’s followers. That’s why this text is full of advice about how to not get distracted, how to not cling to safety nets, how to shake off disappointment and stay focused on what matters most.

The apostles have a specific mission to share Jesus’ ministry by doing work they have seen him do. They give people the chance to start over, confront what harms them, care for illnesses, and restore health and wellbeing wherever they go. I see Christ followers in our churches today who devote themselves to those specific tasks of Jesus’ mission. I admire how they find their callings and remain faithful to their paths.

One church member calls and visits homebound members. Another leads in worship by playing in the bell choir. One meets with state legislators about social justice issues. 

Our callings can change over time. At one point, I led Christian education classes. At other times, I did a lot of mission projects. Now I play the flute and do dramatic readings during worship. 

Even if you’re not sure what your specific mission should be right now, showing up in your congregation is a helpful way to discern your path. See what intrigues you. Distractions and fears will always be with us, but when we find our focus, we’ll know that we’re on the right track.

Consider

How do you keep yourself from being distracted from what matters most?

Pray

God, help us to not be tempted by our distractions or fears, but to remain focused on and steadfast in our calling to your mission. Amen.



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